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Cisco Nexus 1000v Free-mium Pricing Model Release Reaction/Commentary

Alright… so Cisco announced a Q4 2012 availability of a new version of the Nexus 1000v virtual switch in September. Of course, the release is going to have so many features and functions that there is no way we could not justify paying the $695/CPU that they charged (plus support) for the virtual switch.

A mere 4 hours into October, a blog post was published from Cisco (http://blogs.cisco.com/datacenter/new-nexus-1000v-free-mium-pricing-model/) dramatically reducing the cost of playing with their toys to a big fat $0 (plus support). Check out the break down of the features:

Image

[Note: the graphic above was taken from the blog post and can be found by following the link above]

I have three very differing reactions to the announcement that I am struggling with determining which one wins out:

1. Nice move Cisco

This was a very smart move on Cisco’s part. The adoption of the Cisco 1000v has been anything but spectacular. Functionality sounds great from a high level. However, when compared with the price and availability of the VMware Distributed Virtual Switch that is available out of the box, why make the jump to a per CPU solution?!

Plus, with the up and coming virtual network changes coming our way, getting customers to buy in to the Cisco ecosystem before will get them locked in for whatever the future holds. Nicira has the potential to shake up the virtual switching in upcoming releases.

2. Great… more people using Nexus 1000v

My experiences in $CurrentJob involve using an environment with 1000v deployments all over the place… and the results have been less than spectacular. All too often, a networking issue arises that we lose visibility to, ports being blocked with no explanation, VSM upgrade failures, VEM upgrade failures, etc… To say I am a fan of the 1000v would be pretty far fetched. Probably better stated: To say I am a fan of our 1000v implementation would be pretty far fetched. I am sure 1000v implementations out there are more successful. I just have a hard time recommending to people to implement the 1000v in their environments when the provided distributed virtual switch is good enough.

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3. Great! More people using Nexus 1000v

See what I did there?! (“…” vs “!”)

In my self-admitted limited times with the Nexus 1000v, it really seems like there is a lack of people that know ANYTHING about the 1000v. Understanding the NX-OS side of the switch is critical (obviously). But, so is understanding the nature of a virtual environment (especially with vCloud Director making more of a play in datacenters) and the virtual environment implemented (1000v will support VMware, Microsoft, Xen, and KVM hypervisors) is equally as important. The nature of the workloads and behaviors change.

So, by having more people using the Nexus 1000v, there will be more and more people available as “experts’ or at least legitimately “experienced” with the product than before. This can bode well for future implementations for sure.

 

Ultimately, I think this is a good move. Cisco is acknowledging that getting another “advanced” product into the ecosystem a gratis helps drive purchasing for other Cisco products in the datacenter. Plus, at a much higher level, it is an acknowledgement in the direction that the market is moving… and they’re trying to get a toe-hold before the SDN wave takes hold. Will this fix what I am working with? Not one bit. Will this fix what I will be working with in the future? With more people having experience, it may for sure.

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  1. February 10, 2013 at 7:50 am | #1

    This amazing blog, “Cisco Nexus 1000v Free-mium Pricing Model Release Reaction/Commentary Virtual Bill” reveals the fact that u fully understand
    precisely what u r communicating about! I really thoroughly agree.
    With thanks ,Laurene

  2. February 26, 2013 at 11:06 am | #2

    Nice post which The adoption of the Cisco 1000v has been anything but spectacular. Functionality sounds great from a high level. However, when compared with the price and availability of the VMware Distributed Virtual Switch that is available out of the box, why make the jump to a per CPU solution. Thanks a lot for posting.

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